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Wikipedia:Today's featured article

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Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

Each day, a summary (roughly 975 characters long) of one of Wikipedia's featured articles (FAs) appears at the top of the Main Page as Today's Featured Article (TFA). The Main Page typically gets around 15 million hits per day.

TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators: Dank (not active), Jimfbleak and Wehwalt. WP:TFAA displays the current month, with easy navigation to other months. If you notice an error in an upcoming TFA summary, please feel free to fix it yourself; if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, please leave a message at WP:ERRORS so an administrator can fix it. Articles can be nominated for TFA at the TFA requests page, and articles with a date connection within the next year can be suggested at the TFA pending page. Feel free to bring questions and comments to the TFA talk page, and you can ping all the TFA coordinators by adding "{{@TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

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From today's featured article

Early 20th-century map of Barren Island
Early 20th-century map of Barren Island

Barren Island is a former island on the southeast shore of Brooklyn in New York City. Located on Jamaica Bay, it was occupied by the Lenape Native Americans prior to the arrival of Dutch settlers in the 17th century. Its name is a corruption of Beeren Eylandt, the Dutch-language term for "Bears' Island". From the 1850s to the mid-1930s, the island was an industrial complex with plants for rendering fish and processing the carcasses of the city's dead horses, converting them into industrial products. Because of this, the body of water on the island's western shore was nicknamed "Dead Horse Bay". By the 1920s, most of the industrial activity had tapered off, and most residents were evicted in the late 1920s for the construction of an airport called Floyd Bennett Field. Since 1972, the former island's site has been part of the Gateway National Recreation Area, managed by the National Park Service. (Full article...)

From tomorrow's featured article

Rajinikanth and Aishwarya Rai
Rajinikanth and Aishwarya Rai

Enthiran (Robot) is a 2010 Indian Tamil-language science fiction film written and directed by S. Shankar. Produced by Kalanithi Maran, it stars Rajinikanth and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan (both pictured). The story revolves around a scientist's struggle to control his creation, an android that can comprehend and exhibit human emotions. The project backfires when the robot falls in love with the scientist's girlfriend, and is manipulated by a rival scientist into becoming homicidal. Enthiran received praise for Rajinikanth's performance and for its cinematography, art direction, and visual effects. It emerged as the top-earning Indian film of 2010 and is among the highest-grossing South Indian films of all time. It won two Indian National Film Awards, three Filmfare Awards, seven Vijay Awards and two Screen Awards. It has spawned parodies and homages. Enthiran was followed up by a standalone sequel, 2.0, released in 2018. (Full article...)

From the day-after-tomorrow's featured article

B-29 Superfortress bombers shortly before participating in the attack
B-29 Superfortress bombers shortly before participating in the attack

The Bombing of Yawata on the night of 15/16 June 1944 was the first air raid on the Japanese home islands conducted by United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) strategic bombers during World War II. The attack was undertaken by 75 B-29 Superfortress heavy bombers (examples pictured) staging from bases in China. Only 47 of these aircraft dropped bombs near the raid's primary target, the Imperial Iron and Steel Works at Yawata, and little damage was caused. Five B-29s were lost in accidents during the operation and two were destroyed by Japanese aircraft. While the raid did not achieve its aims, it raised Japanese civilians' awareness that their country was being defeated and received unduly positive media coverage in the United States. Intelligence gathered also revealed weaknesses in Japan's air defenses and the raid was the first of many on Japan. Yawata was attacked again on 20 August 1944. Much of the city was destroyed in a firebombing raid conducted by B-29s based in the Mariana Islands on 8 August 1945. (Full article...)